The Buns & Roses Book Club formed in 2010 and is open to everyone who enjoys a good read.

The group meets about once every two months on a Sunday afternoon at the Corner Cafe at Leeds City Museum from 2.30pm.  Books are chosen at least a month in advance to give you plenty of time to get a copy and get stuck in, however we don't mind if you haven't had chance to finish the book!

We are a very friendly book club - open to partners and friends of WI members and we don't mind if you haven't finished the book, have only seen a film version of it, have listened to audio version at double speed  or have just read a Wikipedia entry about it - come along and share your opinions or listen to those of others with the opportunity of sampling the delightful wares of the Museum Cafe should you feel like it.

Our next meeting is on Sunday 23rd June and we've broken the rules slightly by taking on two books! The first book we'll be discussing is The Seal Woman's Gift by Sally Magnussen.

The overview below is from Goodreads.

"In 1627 Barbary pirates raided the coast of Iceland and abducted some 400 of its people, including 250 from a tiny island off the mainland. Among the captives sold into slavery in Algiers were the island pastor, his wife and their three children. Although the raid itself is well documented, little is known about what happened to the women and children afterwards. It was a time when women everywhere were largely silent.

In this brilliant reimagining, Sally Magnusson gives a voice to Ásta, the pastor's wife. Enslaved in an alien Arab culture Ásta meets the loss of both her freedom and her children with the one thing she has brought from home: the stories in her head. Steeped in the sagas and folk tales of her northern homeland, she finds herself experiencing not just the separations and agonies of captivity, but the reassessments that come in any age when intelligent eyes are opened to other lives, other cultures and other kinds of loving.

The Sealwoman's Gift is about the eternal power of storytelling to help us survive. The novel is full of stories - Icelandic ones told to fend off a slave-owner's advances, Arabian ones to help an old man die. And there are others, too: the stories we tell ourselves to protect our minds from what cannot otherwise be borne, the stories we need to make us happy.
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The other book we'll be discussing is The Immortalists by Chloe Benjamin.  

The overview below is from Goodreads. 

"If you knew the date of your death, how would you live your life?

It's 1969 in New York City's Lower East Side, and word has spread of the arrival of a mystical woman, a traveling psychic who claims to be able to tell anyone the day they will die. The Gold children—four adolescents on the cusp of self-awareness—sneak out to hear their fortunes.

The prophecies inform their next five decades. Golden-boy Simon escapes to the West Coast, searching for love in '80s San Francisco; dreamy Klara becomes a Las Vegas magician, obsessed with blurring reality and fantasy; eldest son Daniel seeks security as an army doctor post-9/11; and bookish Varya throws herself into longevity research, where she tests the boundary between science and immortality.

A sweeping novel of remarkable ambition and depth, The Immortalists probes the line between destiny and choice, reality and illusion, this world and the next. It is a deeply moving testament to the power of story, the nature of belief, and the unrelenting pull of familial bonds."

If you have any book suggestions, please get in touch and let us know.